Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Is this compatible with a Wordpress blog?
Q. Given that this is a PHP script, does the page extension need to be changed to .php?
Q. Does this script rely on cookies, and what if they are disabled in a visitor's browser?
Q. Why doesn't your script use a MySQL database?
Q. Given that you don't need a database, how is the data stored?


Q: Is this compatible with a Wordpress blog?

A: I have successfully installed this on a Wordpress blog. However, to execute PHP in posts or pages, you will need a Wordpress plug-in. The plug-in I used was called Exec-PHP, which requires Wordpress 2.0 or higher. The plug-in instructions say you need to turn off the "rich" post editor when writing a post, but I've found that if you switch from "Visual" to "Code" mode, you can insert the PHP code while in "Code" mode, but when you view it again, the PHP code seems to vanish! So I'd personally recommend adding it to a post last, once you've typed up the content of your post.

Please note that purchasing the Power Split Tester program does not include technical support for Wordpress plug-ins.

Q. Given that this is a PHP script, does the page extension need to be changed from .html to .php on a campaign page?

A page on which you wish to use Power Split Tester needs to be PHP enabled in order to display the rotation elements, which normally means changing the page extension from .html to .php (i.e. simply renaming the page from page.html to page.php... and this includes the action page, for tracking actions). However, instructions are provided for how to change your .htaccess file to enable pages ending in .html to still process PHP, meaning it is possible to leave a page with its .html extension.

However, the easiest way of enabling PHP on page.html will always be to rename it page.php and this would save you having to change the .htaccess file, which is more technical.

Q. Does this script rely on cookies, and what if they are disabled in a visitor's browser?

Although the script uses cookies, it isn't entirely reliant on them, but also uses IP tracking and the "unique tag identifier" for use with email subscriptions.


Q. Why doesn't your script use a MySQL database?

I chose not to use a MySQL database for two main reasons: (a) creating a database is quite technical for many customers, and I wanted to make my script as easy to install as possible; and (b) some people do not have access to, or only have a limited number of, MySQL databases from their hosting provider.

Q. Given that you don't need a database, how is the data stored?

The installation script creates a public directory on your site for you to put the script files, and it also creates a "data" sub-directory within this public directory in which it stores the data. This sub-directory is given a random name, such as data1827209472, making it extremely unlikely that a member of the public would be able to find it.

For more technically minded people, you are free to move this "data" directory to a location outside of the public directory, as long as you manually edit the script generated configuration file to reflect the new location.





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